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stone and dust

photography and musings on cemeteries, memorials, and other monuments

Site 74: Hagi’s Tōkōji Cemetery

Ah, the dilemma. Should I write about Tōkōji and Daishoin together, or separately? They are virtually twin temples/cemeteries here in Hagi, but they were built at opposite ends of the city. There are some slight differences though, and to help me keep them Continue reading “Site 74: Hagi’s Tōkōji Cemetery”

Site 73: Nagasaki’s 26 Martyrs Monument

On February 5, 1597, 26 Christians (20 Japanese, 6 foreign priests) were crucified and lanced to death on 26 crosses put up on Nishizaka Hill. Their deaths were meant to serve as a warning to burgeoning Christian population of Nagasaki. The early Continue reading “Site 73: Nagasaki’s 26 Martyrs Monument”

Site 72: Nagasaki’s Sakamoto Int’l Cemetery

Not far from the one-legged torii that stands near Sano Shrine is Nagasaki’s most well-known cemetery, the Sakamoto International Cemetery. It’s claim to fame lies mostly in the fact that is the final resting place for Thomas B. Glover, a Scottish industrialist who Continue reading “Site 72: Nagasaki’s Sakamoto Int’l Cemetery”

Site 70: Nagasaki’s Sōfuku-ji Temple Cemetery

Sōfuku-ji is an old Chinese temple not far from Nagasaki’s Chinatown. It was established in 1629 by a Chinese monk name Chaonian and is actually one of the best examples of a Ming dynasty temple not only in Japan, but in China as well. Most of the structures were Continue reading “Site 70: Nagasaki’s Sōfuku-ji Temple Cemetery”

Site 71: Nagasaki’s Oura Cemetery

Nagasaki is well-known for the number of foreign nationals that traded, worked, and lived there over the centuries. In the Meiji era especially, a large foreign population lived in the Dejima and Oura neighbourhoods. The Oura Catholic Church is the oldest church Continue reading “Site 71: Nagasaki’s Oura Cemetery”

Site 69: Nagasaki’s Inasa Cemetery

Nagasaki is known for its openness and interactions with foreign merchants, traders, and missionaries, even when all of Japan was shut to the rest of the world. As such, it shouldn’t be a surprise that there is not one, but three cemeteries where foreign nationals Continue reading “Site 69: Nagasaki’s Inasa Cemetery”

Site 68: Nagasaki’s Peace Park

Three days after the horrific events of August 6, 1945, Japan was devastated once again when the Fat Man bomb was dropped over Nagasaki. Even though this was a bigger bomb than the one dropped on Hiroshima, its damage was limited due to the geography Continue reading “Site 68: Nagasaki’s Peace Park”

Site 67: Hiroshima’s Peace Park

The first time I visited the Peace Park and Memorial in Hiroshima was in 2000, the year I got transferred to work in the city. It was the first place I visited after I got settled in here. I remember that as I walked through the park, I was very conscious of being from the “side” that Continue reading “Site 67: Hiroshima’s Peace Park”

Site 66: Kyoto’s Honen-in Temple Cemetery

I like to go for walks at night. It’s quieter, cooler, and there are fewer people out and about. It gives me a chance to de-stress and get a little exercise while I’m at it. However, I’ve gotten quite bored with my little neighbourhood, so I’ve been jumping on Continue reading “Site 66: Kyoto’s Honen-in Temple Cemetery”

Cemetery 65: Stuttgart’s Hoppenlau-Friedhof

Well, this was the last stop on my German cemetery tour, Part 1. Hopefully I’ll be back again to visit other parts of Germany to see what other beautiful and/or interesting cemeteries they have. I have to admit that I was pleasantly surprised on this trip, which Continue reading “Cemetery 65: Stuttgart’s Hoppenlau-Friedhof”

Cemetery 64: Stuttgart’s Pragfriedhof

I didn’t know what to expect when I arrived in Stuttgart, but I found that I liked the city very much. It has a number of cemeteries one could visit as well, although I only really had time for two. The first on the list was Pragfriedhof, about a 30-minute walk north Continue reading “Cemetery 64: Stuttgart’s Pragfriedhof”

Cemetery 63: Worms’ Heiligar Sand

On my way from Cologne to Stuttgart, I stopped by the small city of Worms, which happens to have the oldest surviving Jewish cemetery in Europe (if you don’t count Jewish burials in Roman catacombs). It is called Heiligar Sand, which means “Holy Continue reading “Cemetery 63: Worms’ Heiligar Sand”

Cemetery 62: Cologne’s Melaten Cemetery

I usually try to avoid going to cemeteries on Sundays, as I know this will be a day when there will be many mourners and other visitors there to visit and tend to graves. Since I like to be as unobtrusive as possible, I find that going any other day of the week to be preferred. Continue reading “Cemetery 62: Cologne’s Melaten Cemetery”

Cemetery 61: Hamburg’s Ohlsdorf Cemetery

German cemeteries rarely make it into any top ten or twenty list of the best cemeteries to visit, and I’m not sure why. Well, maybe I do. Firstly, I have a feeling that most people who write those lists have not been to any of the cemeteries they write about. Secondly, and this is connected to the first Continue reading “Cemetery 61: Hamburg’s Ohlsdorf Cemetery”

Cemetery 60: Salzburg’s Peterfriedhof

Down in the heart of Salzburg lies its oldest cemetery, Peterfriedhof. It lies at the base of the cliff on which Holhensalzburg Castle sits. Despite (or because of) the fact that there are numerous major attractions all around, this cemetery is popular with visitors to Salzburg, as evidenced by Continue reading “Cemetery 60: Salzburg’s Peterfriedhof”

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