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stone and dust

travel, photography and musings on cemeteries, memorials, and other dark sites

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cemeteries

Site 178: Rome’s Non-Catholic Cemetery

How lovely it is to be in Rome in late March. The weather is warm and sunny, the trees and flowers are in bloom, and the tourists are not overwhelming. Rome, of course, is no stranger to tourists, having been art of nearly every tourist’s European tour for Continue reading “Site 178: Rome’s Non-Catholic Cemetery”

Site 177: Rome’s Campo Verano

When and if a cemetery in Rome gets mentioned, it’s usually the Non-Catholic Cemetery, where Keats and Shelley are buried, that get the attention. The Verano Cemetery, on the other hand, rarely seems to make any list, and it’s a shame, for Continue reading “Site 177: Rome’s Campo Verano”

Site 173: Chernobyl (Day 1)

I don’t know when I first thought about visiting Chernobyl – I think it’s been on my mind for years, probably from the first time I saw photos of the abandoned buildings in Pripyat. I remember when the accident was first announced to the world – Continue reading “Site 173: Chernobyl (Day 1)”

Site 171: Kyiv’s Baikove Cemetery

Before coming to Kiev I hadn’t really heard or read of any major cemeteries in the city (of course not – the much darker site of Chernobyl to the north would draw most visitors). But a quick Google search led to me Baikove, which is the city’s Continue reading “Site 171: Kyiv’s Baikove Cemetery”

Site 170: Kyiv’s St. Sophia Cathedral

Ukraine’s first World Heritage site is well worthy of the distinction. I headed here on my first day in Kiev and it really was an impressive place to visit. It was after The Hagia Sophia in Istanbul (then Constantinople), and has 13 green cupolas. The interior, Continue reading “Site 170: Kyiv’s St. Sophia Cathedral”

Site 169: Kraków-Płaszów Concentration Camp

Today I went to Oskar Schindler’s old enamelware factory that’s now a museum. It was by far the best museum that I’ve been to so far on this trip. The exhibits, explanations, (real) photos, all worked together to give a snapshot into what was life was like in Continue reading “Site 169: Kraków-Płaszów Concentration Camp”

Site 168: Kraków’s Wawel Cathedral

Wawel Hill seems to be on every visitor’s list when visiting Kraków, and one of the most important structures on top of the the hill is Wawel Cathedral. The first iteration of the cathedral was built and destroyed in the 11th century, a second built was destroyed Continue reading “Site 168: Kraków’s Wawel Cathedral”

Site 166: Kraków’s Rakowicki Cemetery

Just north of Kraków’s main station lies a large cemetery known as Rakowicki. Before coming here I had never heard of it, I guess in part because so much of Kraków’s history is more tied to WWII and the Holocaust. On a very changeable morning (from rain Continue reading “Site 166: Kraków’s Rakowicki Cemetery”

Site 167: Auschwitz-Birkenau

This is a hard one to write about. What do you write about the most infamous concentration camp in history? Over 1.1 million people died here. Most of them were Jews. In fact, one out of every 6 Jews who died in the Holocaust died here. Continue reading “Site 167: Auschwitz-Birkenau”

Site 165: Kraków’s New Jewish Cemetery

After visiting Remah Cemetery, I headed over to theNew Jewish Cemetery which was only a couple blocks away. Unfortunately, when I got there it was clear that some kind of reconstruction work was going on and the gates were locked. I couldn’t read the Continue reading “Site 165: Kraków’s New Jewish Cemetery”

Site 164: Kraków’s Remah Cemetery

Remah (or Remuh) Cemetery, also known as the Old Jewish Cemetery, is an old 16th-century cemetery which was named after Rabbi Moses Isserles, who was also known as Remah. He was eventually laid to rest in the cemetery and his gravestone Continue reading “Site 164: Kraków’s Remah Cemetery”

Site 163: Warsaw’s Jewish Cemetery

After visiting the Jewish cemetery in Lublin, I wasn’t sure what to expect here. Would it be the same, overgrown with weeds and leaves and mostly in a neglected state, or would it be like some of the others I’ve been to, crowded but well-maintained? In a way, Continue reading “Site 163: Warsaw’s Jewish Cemetery”

Site 162: Warsaw’s Protestant Reformed Cemetery

Like the Lutheran Cemetery next door, this Calvinist one was also founded in 1792, and saw lots of fighting during various uprisings over the centuries since (cemetery walls make good defences for fighting). It too, sustained a lot of damage, but has been repaired Continue reading “Site 162: Warsaw’s Protestant Reformed Cemetery”

Site 161: Warsaw’s Evangelical-Augsburg Cemetery

Warsaw’s Powazki and Jewish Cemeteries are large and well-known, but there are several other, smaller cemeteries right next door to them as well. One of them is the Lutheran Evangelical-Augsburg Cemetery, established just two years after Powazki. Continue reading “Site 161: Warsaw’s Evangelical-Augsburg Cemetery”

Site 160: Warsaw’s Powązki Cemetery

In my research for Warsaw, the one cemetery that kept coming up was Powązki Cemetery, one I had never heard of. I’ve never seen it in a top ten or twenty list, I don’t recognize any of the statues that come up in Google searches. And I don’t know why. Continue reading “Site 160: Warsaw’s Powązki Cemetery”

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