stone and dust

photography and musings on cemeteries, memorials, and other monuments



Site 114: Barcelona’s Poblenou Cemetery

Barcelona. Home of two of the world’s best cemeteries, Poblenou and Montjuïc. I have wanted to come to Spain to photograph these two cemeteries specifically. After grabbing a quick lunch after arriving in Barcelona, my first (and only) stop of the day was Poblenou.  Continue reading “Site 114: Barcelona’s Poblenou Cemetery”

Site 113: Madrid’s Santa Maria Cemetery

I wasn’t sure what to expect from Santa Maria Cemetery. It was less than a five minute walk from St. Isidro, and had the added benefit of being open later than the other cemeteries, but other than that I didn’t know much about it. It’s inside St. Isidro park, and next to a funeral home Continue reading “Site 113: Madrid’s Santa Maria Cemetery”

Site 112: Madrid’s St. Isidro Cemetery

The forecast called for sun this afternoon, but in the end, I visited two cemeteries in the rain. I would have visited more, but I planned (or in this case, didn’t plan) badly. I assumed that most cemeteries would be open until at least 4 p.m. (but most likely 6), but I was wrong. Continue reading “Site 112: Madrid’s St. Isidro Cemetery”

Site 111: Spain’s Valley of the Fallen

Last month I went to a Dark Tourism conference in Amsterdam where I saw a number of presentations from people studying various aspects of what is commonly known as “dark tourism,” although most sites under that umbrella don’t like to be considered as such Continue reading “Site 111: Spain’s Valley of the Fallen”

Site 109: Madrid’s Almudena Cemetery

Welcome to the Cementerio de Nuestra Señora de La Almudena, one of the largest cemeteries in Europe. I spent the afternoon here and even then I barely scratched the surface. I’m not sure how to describe this cemetery – there are large gates and fences that leave Continue reading “Site 109: Madrid’s Almudena Cemetery”

Site 108: Lisbon’s Pantheon

The 17th-century Church of Santa Engrácia became Lisbon’s pantheon in the 20th century in order to honour the country’s most illustrious people. It’s located in the Almafa district of the city, an area full of tiny winding streets that go up pretty steeply up the hill. Continue reading “Site 108: Lisbon’s Pantheon”

Site 106: Lisbon’s Prazeres Cemetery

So the Pleasure Cemetery (Prazeres in Portuguese) lies in the west of the city (or what used to be the west), and is the twin the Cemetery of Alto de São João in the east. At first glance, they do seem very similar – both on enviable hillside locations, both full of family mausoleums, Continue reading “Site 106: Lisbon’s Prazeres Cemetery”

Site 98: The Hague’s St. Petrus Banden Cemetery

As readers of this blog will probably realize, I prefer going to older cemeteries, not only for the older monuments and atmosphere, but also because it means I won’t interfere with any modern-day mourners who are there to grieve for their loved ones. Continue reading “Site 98: The Hague’s St. Petrus Banden Cemetery”

Site 96: Antwerp’s Schoonselhof Cemetery

How many cemeteries have their own castle? Schoonselhof does, although it was initially a country pleasure house (and still looks that way, if not worse for wear). Between 1540 and 1871 it had 20 owners, but when the last died a bachelor, the city eventually bought it with intent of making it a municipal cemetery. Continue reading “Site 96: Antwerp’s Schoonselhof Cemetery”

Site 90: Brussels’ Laeken Cemetery

Wow, is this a beautiful cemetery. This is the one that was on my list from the very beginning, I’ve been wanting to come to Belgium to photograph this cemetery for sometime. I knew I was off to a good start when, the moment I entered, I Continue reading “Site 90: Brussels’ Laeken Cemetery”

Site 89: Ghent’s Western Cemetery

This cemetery was a pleasant surprise. It wasn’t even on my initial list of cemeteries to visit in Belgium, but it turned out to be one of the best (so far). If Ghent has a Pere Lachaise-like Cemetery, this is it. It’s a fairly large cemetery, but it’s easy to get around and explore. It was established as a landscape garden cemetery, so it is a really nice place to wander and walk around. Continue reading “Site 89: Ghent’s Western Cemetery”

Cemetery 48: Helsinki’s Hietaniemi Cemetery

Since I often travel alone I usually don’t worry too much about what I see and when. This sometimes backfires, but usually it works well, allowing me to stay in places that catch my interest and forgoing those that don’t. Unfortunately, when I was in St. Petersburg I got really sick Continue reading “Cemetery 48: Helsinki’s Hietaniemi Cemetery”

Cemetery 46: Stockholm’s Skogskyrkogården

For all you taphophiles out there, how many cemeteries do think are listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site? Well, I’ll give you a hint: Skogskyrkogården is one of them*. It was inscribed on the list in 1994, yet, I have to admit that I had never heard of it until I started doing my research for Continue reading “Cemetery 46: Stockholm’s Skogskyrkogården”

Cemetery 45: Turku Cemetery

I had a couple of days in Turku, Finland, before heading off to Stockholm. I hadn’t planned on visiting any cemetery here, but when looking at the maps of the city it was clear that there was a large cemetery to be visited on the outskirts of town. Despite arriving in the city early in the morning, Continue reading “Cemetery 45: Turku Cemetery”

Cemetery 44: Peter and Paul Fortress

Peter and Paul Fortress is of course one of the main tourist sites of St. Petersburg. It was established by Peter the Great in 1703 on a small island in the Neva River, and over the years it had many roles from military base to political prison. Some of the famous people who were imprisoned Continue reading “Cemetery 44: Peter and Paul Fortress”

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