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stone and dust

travel, photography and musings on cemeteries, memorials, and other dark sites

Site 134: Boston’s King’s Chapel Burying Ground

A few blocks south of Copp’s Hill Burying Ground lies another cemetery on the Freedom Trail, the King’s Chapel Burying Ground. This was the first cemetery established in the city of Boston and it dates back to 1630.  Nearly five decades later, King’s Chapel Continue reading “Site 134: Boston’s King’s Chapel Burying Ground”

Site 133: Boston’s Copp’s Hill Cemetery

Any visitor to Boston will quickly learn about the Freedom Trail, a path you can follow through the centre of Boston that connects various sites related to Boston’s involvement in the Revolution and the subsequent founding of the United States. There Continue reading “Site 133: Boston’s Copp’s Hill Cemetery”

Site 132: Cambridge’s Old Burial Ground

At the corner of Harvard Square, a quiet green area lies oblivious to the thousands of students and other passersby making their way to classes and job interviews in the streets beyond.  This is Cambridge’s Old Burial Ground, established in 1635 just Continue reading “Site 132: Cambridge’s Old Burial Ground”

Site 131: Boston’s Mount Auburn Cemetery

Mount Auburn, located not too far from Harvard University, has the distinction of being the first rural cemetery created in the United States. Like Europe in the early 19th century, increasing urbanization in the US meant the need for larger cemeteries Continue reading “Site 131: Boston’s Mount Auburn Cemetery”

Site 130: Salem’s Howard Street Cemetery

Salem’s Howard Street Cemetery doesn’t seem to get the same love as the Old Burying Point, despite the fact that it has a much darker history. The current location was probably just a field next to the old Salem dungeon during the witch trial hysteria, Continue reading “Site 130: Salem’s Howard Street Cemetery”

Site 129: Salem’s The Old Point Burying Cemetery

Salem, a town synonymous with witches, has completely leaned into its own mythology. That has both its benefits and disadvantages: on the one hand, the town has had to come to terms with what is, in fact, a dark stain on its past: the Salem witch trials. On the other Continue reading “Site 129: Salem’s The Old Point Burying Cemetery”

Site 128: Plymouth’s Burial Hill Cemetery

After a thoroughly enjoyable visit to Plimoth Plantation, I headed over to Plymouth’s Burial Hill Cemetery and got my first real taste of truly old headstones, the kind I always saw in movies but never in real life. In some of the European (re: English) cemeteries Continue reading “Site 128: Plymouth’s Burial Hill Cemetery”

Site 127: Concord’s Sleepy Hollow Cemetery

I don’t remember when I first read Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, but it remained one of my favourite books when I was growing up. I watched many of the different movie versions that have been made throughout the years, but my favourite remains Continue reading “Site 127: Concord’s Sleepy Hollow Cemetery”

Site 126: St. John’s Cathedral Cemetery

As mentioned in my previous post, the history of European settlement in Canada is not that old, since most ‘settlements’ were small forts and trading posts that mostly dealt with the fur trade and other natural resources (timber, fishing, and minerals, Continue reading “Site 126: St. John’s Cathedral Cemetery”

Site 125: St. Andrew’s-on-the-Red Cemetery

The history of Canada, and Manitoba specifically, is often tied to its abundant natural resources, the fur trade, and/or the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC), which was established in 1670 and controlled much of the fur trade in what is now Canada. They had forts Continue reading “Site 125: St. Andrew’s-on-the-Red Cemetery”

Site 124: Osaka’s Shitennōji Temple & Cemetery

Shitennōji Temple is one of the oldest temples in Japan (593 CE) and the first state one. Prince Shotoku, who supported the introduction of Buddhism in Japan, is the one that founded this temple. It’s been destroyed by fire several times since it was built, but it has always been faithfully Continue reading “Site 124: Osaka’s Shitennōji Temple & Cemetery”

Site 123: Osaka’s Mozu Kofungun

Most people are not aware that one of the largest burial tombs in the world is right here in Japan, in the southern part of Osaka. These kofun are scattered throughout Japan. Although they are referred to as keyhole tombs, they do come in a variety of other shapes, from Continue reading “Site 123: Osaka’s Mozu Kofungun”

Japan’s Day(s) of the Dead: Celebrating O-bon

Japan is no stranger to disaster: earthquakes, typhoons, volcanic eruptions, plagues, flooding, and landslides have been a part of this island-nation’s landscape since the beginning. Even now, recent disasters as of June-August 2018 including the flooding and landslides in Continue reading “Japan’s Day(s) of the Dead: Celebrating O-bon”

The Art of Photographing Cemeteries: Part 3

For the final part of this series, I want to talk about some of the ethical issues surrounding photographing cemeteries. People have a lot of differing opinions when it comes to visiting cemeteries, and photography, or any other activity that is not quite related to the purpose Continue reading “The Art of Photographing Cemeteries: Part 3”

The Art of Photographing Cemeteries: Part 2

In my last post, I wrote about how light is probably the most important aspect of a successful photograph. Despite anyone’s preferences for a certain kind of light, the fact is any and all kinds of light have their disadvantages. The key is knowing how that light will work Continue reading “The Art of Photographing Cemeteries: Part 2”

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